Exhibit
This is a presentation of all of Henrik Ibsen's plays that have been staged professionally at least on one occasion.

The presentation of Ibsen's Plays in Photographs is also based mainly on pictures from the National Theatre's collection. The National Theatre has staged 22 Ibsen plays. In the few cases that one of his plays has not been shown by the Norwegian National Theatre, we have borrowed photos from the Bergen Theater Museum and the archivs of the Dagsavisen Newspaper in Oslo. This applies to The Feast at Solhaug and St. John's Night.

Ibsen's very first play for the stage, The Warrior's Barrow, has never been played again after 1850-51 at any theatre, as far as we know, and so no photographs exist that can illustrate the play. We have used a silhouette of Ibsen's mother, Marichen, the way she looked as a young woman. It is an idealized image of wonamkind, symbolic of the strong-willed female ideal supplied by Ibsen in his very first play.

The second of the "forgotten" works of the young Ibsen, the adventure play St. John's Night, was later disowned by its author. This play and two others, The Warrior's Barrow and Olaf Liljekrans, were excluded from the standard Collected Works. However, St.John's Night was performed at Det Norske Theater (the Norwegian Theater) in Bergen in 1853. From recent years the only professional production known by us was the Maridalsspillet production in 1985, and the photograph is from this production.

 

The picture from Olaf Liljekrans shows the National Theatre production directed by Arne Eggen. It was staged in its original form at the Telemark Teater / Teater Ibsen in 1978.

The Feast at Solhaug was premiered at Det Norske Theater (the Norwegian Theater). Bergen is the only Norwegian theater town to uphold a tradition of staging this drama from Ibsen's younger days. It could be seen at Den Nationale Scene in Bergen in 1917, in 1928 (on the anniversary of Ibsen's birth on March 20) and in 1955.

The short play Norma - or The Love of a Politician was published as a humorous newspaper piece, a contemporary satire in drama form. We do not know of any professional productions of this text, but still we decided to include it here. We have taken the liberty of illustrating the presentation with a stage photo from Bellini's Norma, which served as a sort of original for Ibsen's parody.

Responsible for this presentation:
Bent Kvalvik (textual content and selection of photographs)
Torill Venes Skatland (design)
Karl Erik Andersen (English translation):


These pages were produced by Nasjonalbiblioteket.